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Indie Author Spotlight: Adam LaValley



After recently turning 18, Adam Lewis LaValley is the youngest success story at BookRix. Adam, known as “rootrot”, is one of the most well-known young writers on BookRix, and his hard work is starting to pay off – His first self-published eBook, The Mountain Man, has been in our top 10 sales ranking since January! Adam is a multi-talented writer; he is a self-proclaimed history buff, and just published his first historical book, Freedom Ho! Extravagant Stories from America’s Past. He also recently published CORE – today’s featured book – a futuristic sci-fi action novel with intense descriptions, plot and back-story only a history connoisseur could create.












The world has been ravaged by nuclear war, famine, and terrorism. In a continent’s ashes, a new power has risen…In its pursuit for supremacy, the power attacks and conquers the neighboring, small thriving country of Maruvi. The Imperial CORE Warrior Program quickly wipes out Maruvi’s defenses and military structures, killing off their best fighters, the Jaspers. Only one lone rebel group remains to resist the invaders, but their attacks are futile…they are forced into hiding as the COREs continue their onslaught.

But that was until one of their own, Unit Radez1079, joined the Resistance. With this professional combatant, the rebels again take arms and rise up. After 40 years of hiding they must rise to fight this power, and this time it’s die or try…

BUY LINKS:
AMAZON
KOBO
ITUNES
BARNES&NOBLE
BOOKRIX












On Sale Now!Coming Soon!
















You can find more free eBooks by Adam LaValley by clicking right HERE!





10 Things You Wouldn’t Have Known About Adam:





1. Loves cartoons and animation in general; anime travel series are a new personal favorite, and he is captivated by Kino’s Journey.
2. Is an amateur graphic artist.
3. Has a thing for messing around with animation; hopes to see one of his stories as an animation on the big screen or television one day.
4. Began drawing funny little cartoon characters at the age of 11.
5. Started a collection of Louis L’Amour Western novels.
6. Aside from Civil War history, loves the Industrial and Progressive Eras.
7. Prefers Teddy Roosevelt and Lincoln over other presidents any day.
8. Favorite saying from Teddy: “Mistah SPEAKAH!”
9. Is a not-too distant blood relative of Ulysses S. Grant, and owns a copy of his autobiography.
10. Hates tomatoes, loves fries!







Adam Lewis LaValley was born and raised in Minnesota, and has been living there since. Having just completed High School, he is now being exposed to the world and all its opportunities. With a deep interest in American history, he plans to take courses at the University of Minnesota to strengthen his understanding of the past and later begin a career in teaching.

Adam LaValley

Adam LaValley

Having written his first full-length novel at the age of 13, Adam has gone on to better his skills at writing by introducing himself to various genres and writing forms. He has found, surprisingly, that his storytelling skill lies in tales of Historical Fiction and Sci-Fi.

After joining the Bookrix community in 2010, Adam has been introduced to a positive environment full of encouragement and ambitious young story writers like himself. His dream of publishing a novel came true when The Mountain Man hit the website’s front page in December 2012, and became a bestseller. Since then, two others have been published.

Aside from writing by himself, Adam is also collaborating with Bookrix writer Timur Iablokov (the.dragon) and DeviantArt artist Plaguey to create a Sci-Fi graphic light novel. Glory’s Palm, a Western novel that will feature three parts to its storyline, will also be published this September.

Find Adam on the Web:
AUTHOR BLOG
AUTHOR ART
FACEBOOK




Comics and Graphic novels: A lifelong obsession.



In honor of Stan Lee’s 90th birthday, let’s talk comics for a while, shall we?

In my family, while growing up, we weren’t allowed to watch too much television (aside from Saturday morning cartoons) or play video games, but we were encouraged to read and play outside to our heart’s content. For me, that meant hiding in the middle of my grandma’s bushes, where nobody could see me, and reading until I was too hungry to stay there anymore. I read anything that was put in front of me, regardless of plot or genre or length. One day, having read all the books I’d taken out from the library, I wandered into my younger brother’s room, hoping to find something in there. Sure, I’d never seen him with a book because he preferred playing in the dirt and sticking slugs to his arms, but hey, I was pretty sure he could read so I thought I’d take a look. Underneath his hockey sticks, his Tazmanian Devil plush toy and a jar of something that could only be described as “revolting”, I found something that would spark a lifelong obsession: A comic book.

Looking back, I can’t remember what it was even about. I know it was Superman because my brother went through a cape wearing phase that was the source of endless entertainment for me and my older sister, but I have no recollection of what the actual book was about. After reading it, I just knew that I’d discovered something great; a book with an incredibly interesting story (who doesn’t think superheroes are awesome?) and detailed graphics to go along with it. As a young readers AND artist, this was a brilliant revelation. I started asking my mom to bring me comic books, and although it mostly started out as Archie Comics from the shelves near the grocery store cashier, it has since grown into so much more. Nowadays, graphic novels are my “grown-up” comic books, but I still can’t get enough.

One of my first favorites was Tank Girl because she is totally chaotic and independent. I was forever searching for myself inside the comics and graphic novels, trying to figure out which superpower was my own. One of my favorite films is based on a graphic novel and I highly recommend that you watch it, Scott Pilgrim vs. The World. So many really spectacular graphic novels are filled with violence, like Sin City300, and Batman, but then there are the truly beautiful stories that remind you that each graphic novel is really a piece of art. Blankets is a great example of this; it’s an intricately woven story of a boy who is dealing with growing up, religion, spirituality, and his first love.

And then, of course, there are the comic book classics: Spiderman, X-Men, The Hulk, Iron Man, The Fantastic Four, Captain America, etc. – all of which were created with the help of Stan Lee and all of which were made internationally famous by major motion pictures. Comic books have gone from being the things traded by nerds in the back of the library at lunch time, to being the inspiration for some of the coolest action movies of this generation. Comic books are cool, and don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

Here are some BookRix books that I think would make great comic books and graphic novels (hover your mouse over the cover to find out more about each book):

Science-fiction

Historical Fiction

Fantasy and Romance

Archives

Grab the BookRix Button

BookRix Between the Lines

HELPFUL BOOKS

BookRix Between the Lines

BookRix Blog Buddies

Reading Addiction Blog Tours Me, My Shelf and I Parajunkee Design When A Southern Woman Rambles